Ontario Trees & Shrubs website

Red-berried Elderberry
Sambucus racemosa

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa) Other common names: Red-berried Elder

Other scientific names: Sambucus callicarpa, Sambucus microbotrys, Sambucus pubens

French names: Sureau rouge

Family: Muskroot Family (Adoxaceae), (Honeysuckle Family (Caprifoliaceae))

Group: Elderberries

Distinctive features: Shrub

Similar species:
  •   Common Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) - Very similar; Black berries, grows in wetter habitats.


Flowers: Spring;  White;  5 parts (petals)

Leaves: Opposite/Whorled, Compound, Toothed

Height: 1 m (3 ft)

Habitat: Forests

Books: Shrubs of Ontario: 451    Newcomb's Wildflower Guide: 320   

Native/Non-native: Native

Notes: The arching branches and thin long leaves give this shrub a graceful appearance. In the spring, clusters of small white flowers give way to clusters of brilliant red berries in the summer..

Origin and Meaning of Names:
 Scientific Name: racemosa: with racemes


Photographs: 151 photographs available, of which 9 are featured on this page. SCROLL DOWN FOR PHOTOGRAPHS.

Range Map is at the bottom of the page

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Red-berried Elderberry flower cluster and leaves.

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Clsoer view.

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Leaves.

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Leaves opening at the beginning of May.

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa) flower buds

Flower cluster bud just opening in mid-April.

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa) ripe berries

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

A nice cluster of ripe fruit.

Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa) pith

the stems of Red-berried Elderberry are rather weak. This photo shows the pith inside.


Range map for Red-berried Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

PLEASE NOTE: A coloured Province or State means this species occurs somewhere in that Province/State.
The entire Province/State is coloured, regardless of where in that Province/State it occurs.

(Range map provided courtesy of the USDA website and is displayed here in accordance with their Policies)